Special Event: WESTERN NEW YORK GENEALOGY CONFERENCE


Western New York Genealogy Conference Logo- Buffalo, New York - October 7, 2017

Quick Links: Conference Overview l Program Descriptions l Presenters l Transportation & Accomodations l Conference Weekend Tours & Events l Other Local Items of Interest l Forms & Flyers


PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS

Session 1-A: Pathways from New England to New York [Taylor]

Thousands of our ancestors journeyed from New England to settle in New York. This session will discuss major pathways between 1780 and 1850 and explore the key motivations that led New Englanders to migrate. We will also discuss the influence—and records—of land companies (particularly the Holland Company) and other factors.

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Session 2-B: Early Probate in New York: From Colonial Dutch & English to Statehood [Wilcox]

New York has a notoriously complicated court system that affects all records, including early probate records that are of particular interest to genealogists. That New York's probate system is difficult to navigate is an understatement. This talk will help demystify the first 225 years of estate records in New York by taking a journey to learn how and where to find wills and administrations through the centuries -- from Dutch and English provinces to early New York State. We'll explore Dutch notarial and provincial records, town records, and various court records including Mayor's, Prerogative, Chancery, Common Pleas, Probate, and Surrogate's and more found at the New York State Archives, county offices, online and more. Essential resources important for successful searching and examples using probate records will be featured.

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Session 3-A: Tour of New York State Genealogical Research Repositories: The Best [Wilcox]

Explore the unique research resources and collections that are held by libraries, county archives, town historians, and historical and genealogical societies in New York State (not including Long Island, NYC and Albany). Among those featured are the Folklife Center at the Crandall Public Library in Glens Falls, Warren County; the Genesee County History Department in Batavia; the Rhinebeck Town Historian at the Starr Library in Rhinebeck, Dutchess County; the Western New York Genealogical Society at the Buffalo and Erie County Public Library in Buffalo; and the Onondaga County Public Library Local History and Genealogy Department in Syracuse. You’ll learn research ideas for any repository as well.

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Session 4-B: Understanding and Using Fulton History [Hogan]

The Fulton History website provides free of charge an index with images for over 37,000,000 pages of newspapers. Most newspapers are from New York State, however papers from 25 states and 4 foreign countries are now included. Site background, best practices, and research tips will be presented.

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Session 5-A: Using Autosomal DNA to Explore Your Ancestry [Bettinger]

For years, genealogists have focused on Y-DNA and mtDNA, unable to access the wealth of information in the remainder of their DNA. At long last, new autosomal DNA tests reveal this hidden information. Genealogists can use autosomal DNA for ethnicity estimates, finding long-lost cousins, and examining specific genealogical problems.

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Session 6-B: Saving and Sharing Local Records: Rochester Genealogical Society Community Case Studies [Lavery and Paprocki]

This session will demonstrate complementary approaches to preserving and accessing local records, with particular emphasis on church records. The hope is that attendees will take away information that will help them preserve and share records in their communities.

The first part of the session will describe the twelve-year evolution of record digitization arm of the Rochester Genealogical Society. With more than 300,000 Monroe County-related pages in its holdings, the group utilizes cameras and scanners to capture church records, cemetery records and town records not easily available to researchers through normal channels. We will cover how the committee was formed, selecting projects, attracting volunteers, obtaining permissions to publish, ownership of the records, privatization, funding, archiving projects, equipment and software used to accomplish the work.

In the second part of the session, you will learn about the Rochester Churches Indexing Project, an eight-year long initiative involving more than 180,000 records. This presentation will provide an overview of the decision-making steps used to determine the scope of the RCIP, the best ways of extracting information, quality-control methods, and optimal presentation formats. It will also demonstrate how the RCIP enables multiple ways of accessing the data records.

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Session 7: The Future of Genealogy [Taylor]

Enjoy a look into the future of family history as we end the day together. This session will explore advances in technology, potential tools for collaboration, and shifts and changes in demographics that will impact the world of genealogy in the years to come.

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Quick Links: Conference Overview l Program Descriptions l Presenters l Transportation & Accomodations l Conference Weekend Tours & Events l Other Local Items of Interest l Forms & Flyers


Last updated: May 15, 2017